John Porcaro

Social Media, Marketing, Community. Proud dad of four amazing kids.

October 19, 2011 at 10:04pm

15 notes
Reblogged from patcronz

EVERYTHING YOU KNOW IS WRONG

metspelf34:

Death is inevitable.
Taste is the enemy of art.
You are not immune.
Rebellion is packaged.
Religion is a club.
Contradiction is balanced.
Guilt is not of God.
Silence = Death.
Peace is a luxury.
Ambition bites the nails of success.
It’s your world, you can change it.
Watch more TV

(Source: patcronz, via drivec)

July 14, 2011 at 3:14pm

16,297 notes
Reblogged from the-universaltruth
brittnimay:

Photography’s Longest Exposure
Six months. That’s right. This dream-like picture shows each phase of the sun over Bristol’s Clifton Suspension Bridge taken during half a year. The image was captured on a pin-hole camera made from an empty soda can with a 0.25mm aperture and a single sheet of photographic paper. Photographer Justin Quinnell strapped the camera to a telephone pole overlooking the Gorge, where it was left between December 19, 2007 and June 21, 2008—the Winter and Summer solstices. (That’s a 15,552,000 second exposure.) ‘Solargraph’ shows six months of the sun’s luminescent trails and its subtle change of course caused by the earth’s movement in orbit. The lowest arc being the first day of exposure on the Winter solstice, while the top curves were captured mid-Summer. (Dotted lines of light are the result of overcast days when the sun struggled to penetrate the cloud.) Quinnell, a renowned pin-hole camera artist, says the photograph took on a personal resonance after his father passed away on April 13—halfway through the exposure. He says the picture allows him to pinpoint the exact location of the sun in the sky at the moment of his father passing.

brittnimay:

Photography’s Longest Exposure

Six months. That’s right. This dream-like picture shows each phase of the sun over Bristol’s Clifton Suspension Bridge taken during half a year. The image was captured on a pin-hole camera made from an empty soda can with a 0.25mm aperture and a single sheet of photographic paper. Photographer Justin Quinnell strapped the camera to a telephone pole overlooking the Gorge, where it was left between December 19, 2007 and June 21, 2008—the Winter and Summer solstices. (That’s a 15,552,000 second exposure.) ‘Solargraph’ shows six months of the sun’s luminescent trails and its subtle change of course caused by the earth’s movement in orbit. The lowest arc being the first day of exposure on the Winter solstice, while the top curves were captured mid-Summer. (Dotted lines of light are the result of overcast days when the sun struggled to penetrate the cloud.) Quinnell, a renowned pin-hole camera artist, says the photograph took on a personal resonance after his father passed away on April 13—halfway through the exposure. He says the picture allows him to pinpoint the exact location of the sun in the sky at the moment of his father passing.

(Source: the-universaltruth, via gavinfantastic)

July 12, 2011 at 4:31pm

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July 7, 2011 at 3:12pm

1 note

Blog Post: Facebook Lists Keep Your Circles Close →

Everyone is talking about Circles, but Facebook Lists are a great way to keep things private and relevant. It’s worth taking a little time to set up Facebook Lists to keep your Circle of friends, colleagues, and acquaintances separate. Just yesterday, I mentioned to a friend that I only have my Facebook Chat open to certain Lists, and she admitted that she didn’t know that was possible.

Create Lists
If you haven’t already, you can create lists under Account/Edit Friends. Think of the groups of friends you might have, and how you might interact differently with one group vs. another. I have Lists for friends, family, co-workers, people from my home town, and a couple of Lists I want to give limited access to.

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Add People to Lists
Facebook makes it easy to add people to Lists. You can scroll through them one at a time, or you can let Facebook “Suggest” people to add to a List. I was surprised at how intelligently Facebook made suggestions for each List, based on who was in the List already. It quickly allowed me to fill up each List, even though I have a bunch of friends that weren’t in any Lists.

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Control What Each List Sees
You’ve probably heard about Facebook Privacy settings, but if not, you should take a little time to adjust the settings for each List. Look under Account/Privacy Settings. I have a couple of groups that I don’t want to share some information with, like a few of my kids’ friends that added me. For example, I block them from knowing what locations I check into. To exclude some Lists, select Customize Settings, then select “Customize” from the drop down list for each of the “Things I share”

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Select Some Lists for Chat
Once you have your Lists set up, it’s easy to narrow down those you want to Chat with. Simply turn off the slider switch to appear offline to some of your Lists.

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Share a status update with a List
You might want to share some information with only some of your Lists. Under the update, select the lock icon, and if you want to exclude some lists, select Customize. Simple as that.

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Taking a bit of time to set up Lists can enhance your privacy, and make Facebook a more enjoyable place to be for everyone.

July 5, 2011 at 12:26pm

3 notes

Why Juries Come Back with a Not Guilty Verdict

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I think I have a pretty good idea about why the Casey Anthony verdict came back so quickly as not guilty.

About a month ago, I spent six days on a jury where a father was accused of sexually abusing his daughter for 10 years. In our case, the trial lasted for three days, and we deliberated for three days. If not for one jury member, we would have wrapped it up in a few hours.

For three days, we sat in a 15 x 10 foot room from 9am to 5pm, going over every piece of the evidence, re-reading our notes, and offering our thoughts.

Out of the gate, we introduced ourselves, then we picked a foreman in a few minutes by asking who was interested in doing it.

Right out of the gate, we took a straw poll, and found that about 9 of the 12 of us felt that the state didn’t prove its case. Most of us felt that there was no physical evidence, not witnesses, and the girl making the accusations changed her story in significant ways. The only people that came forward for the prosecution didn’t corroborate her story.

We would take turns going around the table telling each other why we felt the way we did. By the end of the first day of deliberating, two of the three who thought the man was guilty realized that there wasn’t enough to be sure he was guilty—circumstantial evidence and enough doubt that they couldn’t convict him.

One member of the jury held out, he thought that some evidence (some recorded voicemails from the father) were so unusual that he was sure the man was guilty. As members of the jury, each of us took turns offering our reasoning, trying to show him why we felt the state just didn’t prove its case.

We felt like the evidence showed that the father was controlling, and that the family clearly had a culture different than ours, but that the young woman lied enough times, and that she was likely exaggerating her story in an attempt to make her father angry. And it was likely that her family (who didn’t like the father) prompted her to embellish the truth in order to get the father removed from the home. She clearly stated that she was abused at least 2-3 time every week from the time she was 11. They lived in a small trailer, she shared a room with a sibling, and often had extended family living with them.

And yet not one person would confirm that they saw anything going on. A nurse testified that she heard the story from the 21 year old girl, but they didn’t do any kind of medical exam. The police didn’t present any evidence. They showed us pictures of a car that an alleged event took place, but the pictures were from the internet, and were of the wrong model with a different configuration. Notes from the dad and voicemails only proved that the father missed his daughter when she left home, and that they were very close.

A couple of us on the jury had specific experience where we knew people who made up allegations—even allegations of sexual abuse—that just weren’t true. One small lie became a bigger lie, and when someone believed the story, the story grew. Sympathy to someone who is hurt or angry can be a strong emotion, and it’s easy to say things to help people explain how hurt a person feels, even if it’s a lie. Viewing the evidence in this light cast a lot of doubt, especially given the complete lack of any evidence, other than the girl’s testimony.

It’s sad that if the father did anything inappropriate, or harmed his children, that he wasn’t punished. But in this case, the rules of law were very clear, and we just didn’t have evidence, or even a clear enough picture of what really happened to be sure he did what he was accused of.

For example, one of the five charges was Child Molestation Second Degree. In our state, to be guilty the person had to have had done very specific acts to someone who is twelve or thirteen years old. The evidence we got was flimsy, other than the girl telling the prosecutor (and us on the stand) that she was 13. We debated whether it could have happened when she was 14, but the timeline was so vague that we just couldn’t be sure. Following that kind of logic, we also couldn’t be sure that a specific act brought up in testimony happened when she was 14 or 15, and so on.

By the end of the third day, even the lone holdout was convinced that the state did a poor job presenting and proving its case, and while he thought the man was guilty, he had doubts to the extent, and he believed (like the rest of it) that the girl was making up at least some of the allegations.

A few other things colored our opinion, though I think we would have come to the same conclusion anyway.

First, the prosecutor was looking out the window of the courtroom continually as the defense did her closing arguments. Some came away thinking that he knew he did a poor job, and that he was resigned that he didn’t make his case.

At another point in the trial, the prosecutor attacked one of the witnesses for the plaintiff, the girl’s brother with whom she shared a room. He stated that he never saw the father come in the room (especially 2-3 times a week). He then stated that he saw his father standing in the doorway a few times. When he was pressured, he said he once woke up and saw his father sitting on the edge of the girl’s bed. It made me angry that the lawyer accused the boy of lying, until the boy said what the prosecutor wanted him to say. And even then, it’s not unusual for a father to sit on the edge of his young daughter’s bed.

So, just like today’s acquittal of Casey Anthony, even though the evidence may point to guilt, when you look at the rules of the court, the fact that the jury had to make their entire decision based on the law, and the evidence presented, I definitely can understand why they could come back with a “not guilty” verdict.

July 1, 2011 at 10:47am

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June 30, 2011 at 11:38am

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At a social media in CRM meeting at REI Seattle

At a social media in CRM meeting at REI Seattle

June 28, 2011 at 12:32pm

2 notes

Take the Google Plus tour →

June 27, 2011 at 11:44am

143 notes
Reblogged from steverubel

Twitter's Guide for Newsrooms →

When I first joined Twitter, I noticed the same thing, that leveraging the news shared by those you follow, their “curation,” was the most valuable way to use Twitter. Three years later, it’s confirmed.

steverubel:

The most important part to read is their guide for reporting and how journos are using Twitter to find sources.

Jake Tapper from ABC News:

The way [Twitter has] been most useful is in terms of following people. I’ve been able to use it for reporting and to find sources. Last year when a health insurance company raised its premiums in California and it affected thousands of people, I didn’t know how to reach any of them, so I sent a Tweet out to my followers: “Is there anybody out there who is a customer of Anthem Blue cross who got their insurance premiums raised?”

@lemoneyes tweeted me that she had and so I followed her. I got her information through DM and then emailed her, we verified her situation and then we sent a camera crew to her. The next morning she was on ABC’s Good Morning America. There is no way I could have done that before.

June 24, 2011 at 10:57am

1 note

2 in 3 Users Say Twitter Influences Purchases →

10:39am

1 note

I'm the Dad, That's Why →

My Dad Blog

10:01am

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My Work Blog @Metia →

10:00am

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Enjoy the little things, for one day you may look back and realize they were the big things

June 17, 2011 at 11:54am

22 notes
Lots of arrows pointing out…

Lots of arrows pointing out…

February 7, 2011 at 12:00am

0 notes

Sweet Facebook app Case Study

Interesting case study for a Greek chocolate company that created an online Facebook campaign, by using customizable content that carried the brand message in a creative way. Good job of being useful, sharable, and “social” from beginning to end.

Sweet!

From Digital Buzz blog